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Mon, Jan. 14th, 2008, 10:23 pm
"Swift Horse" ctd (done)

Figured I'd better start a new entry before I run out of room in the first one. Bleah.

If a question mark is appended to a source's page number, it's because I've had to reconstruct the corresponding block of text from Google previews. It's almost like gene sequencing: find an initial snippet and then start to "walk" forward/backward by pushing the keywords into overlapping fragments.

In some cases, I've color-coded interleaved passages to keep track of sequential order.

-----

Swift Horse by Cassie Edwards, New York: Signet Books Dec. 2005, p 123:
"Come forth," he said, motioning toward the warriors with his hands. "Pull the newly killed venison through the flames of the fire, both by the way of a sacrifice, and to consume the blood, life, or animal spirits of the beast."

History of the American Indians by James Adair, London 1775, pp 134 and 117 as cited in The Golden Bough: A Study in Magic and Religion by James George Frazer (Macmillan 1900):
These Indians "commonly pull their new-killed venison (before they dress it) several times through the smoke and flame of the fire, both by way of a sacrifice and to consume the blood, life, or animal spirits of the beast, which with them would be a most horrid abomination to eat."

[Note by Frazer: "The Indians described by Adair are the Creek, Cherokee, and other tribes in the south-east of the United States."]

Same passage from Adair also in Deerskins and Duffels by Kathryn E. Holland Braund, U. of Nebraska Press 1993, p. 64(?):
The trader James Adair noted: They commonly pull their new-killed venison (before they dress it) several times through the smoke and flame of the fire, both by the way of a sacrifice, and to consume the blood, life, or animal spirits of the beast.

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SH pp 123-124:
Smoked meat was essential to Creek subsistence during the winter, and smoked and dried venison served as the main source of animal protein in the Creek diet throughout the year.

Not only were deer used for food to sustain the Creek throughout the cold winter months, the animals were also important in other ways. The deerskins were used for leggings, moccasins, fringe, binding, women's garments, breechcloths, shot pouches, string for bows, and household articles such as bedding, which required a tremendous number of hides.

She knew now that on the hunters' return to the village, they were expected to distribute some of their meat to the elderly and to those who were unable to hunt for themselves, as well as the able-bodied who had remained in the village to protect it from enemies, and the conjurer who provided the medicines that attracted the deer.

Braund, p. 69(?), reconstructed from Google preview fragments:
The smoked meat procured as an adjunct to the hunt was essential to Creek subsistence during the winter. Smoked and dried venison served as the main source of animal protein in the Creek diet throughout the year. On returning to their village, hunters were expected to distribute some of their meat to the elderly and those unable to hunt for themselves, as well as the able-bodied who had remained in the village to protect it from enemies and the conjurers who had provided the medicines that attracted the deer.

Braund, p. 71(?):
Significant numbers of deerskins were needed annually for home consumption as well. Leggings, moccasins, fringe, binding, women's garments, [...?] shot pouches, string for bows, game pieces, and household articles such as bedding required a tremendous number of hides.

-----

SH p. 150:
"Our Creek country is noble and fruitful," Swift Horse said, looking straight ahead as they rode slowly and carefully through the forest, weaving around this tree and that.

"All Creek belong to a totemic clan. My own people's clan is the Wind, so named because a great fog has once shrouded this area and my ancestors were the first to emerge into the clear wind. Ours is one of the most powerful clans associated with a natural phenomenon-- which is the wind. A clan is the cornerstone of Creek justice."

Braund p. 150(?), quoting from another source:
All accounts of the Creek country described "a noble and fruitful country," and white people were eager to possess the "empty" lands.

Braund p 11(?):
Clans were represented by animals, such as Bear, Eagle, Wolf, and Tyger (panther). One of the most powerful clans was associated with a natural phenomenon, the Wind. Only four clan names are mentioned in colonial records—- Wind, Tyger, Bear, and Eagle— although numerous other clans appear frequently in later records.

Braund p 12(?):
Thus, the clan, following established rules for reprisal and retribution of crimes, was the cornerstone of Creek justice, in effect becoming a [....]

-----

SH p. 154:
"Esaugeta Emissee, the master of breath, is a kind spirit who watches over my Creek people," Swift Horse explained, gazing over at Martha and seeing her interest by how she leaned forward, listening. "He is surrounded by a few lesser spirits. Sme animals such as the wolf and rattlesnake occupy positions of deference and honor in my peoiple's culture. Magic permeates our culture."

http://www.nps.gov/archive/ocmu/Creeks.htm , text by Sam Lawson:
Esaugeta Emissee (the Master of Breath) was a kind of great spirit who watched over the Creeks. He was surrounded by many lesser spirits.

"The Creek Indians of Georgia" by Merle M. Baker, History Abraham Baldwin College, Tifton, Georgia and Trustee, Odom Library; quoted on p. 17 of http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~ffru/Docs/FFRU_back/vol13.pdf ("Franklin Family Researches United", Volume 13, January 1885):
Master of Breath or Esaugeta Emissee was the spirit who watched over the Creeks. The wolf and the rattlesnake occupied positions of deference among the Creeks. Magic was important.

-----

SH p. 241-242:
With the accompaniment of skin-covered wooden and pottery drums, gourds and turtle-shell rattles, and a singer, men and women, separately or together, danced in a slow shuffle or wildly animated motions. Suddenly scores of shell-shaker girls joined the men in a dance with a rapid tempo, the sound now almost deafening.

Woohoo, she found some new sources.

Creeks and Seminoles: The Destruction and Regeneration of the Muscogulge People by J. Leitch Wright, U of Nebraska Press 1986, p. 38:
Whatever the obanga's function, the Indians danced. Night after night, perhaps into the early morning, accompanied by skin-covered wooden or pottery drums, gourd and turtle shell rattles, and a singer, men and women, separately or together, painted red, yellow, white, and black, in a slow shuffle or wildly animated motions could be seen in the square grounds and rotundas. When scores of shell-shaker girls joined men in a dance with a rapid tempo, the noise was deafening.

-----

Update, 15 Jan: ...y'know, it strikes me as a bit gauche to pause in the middle of a four-page stretch of intensive plagiarism, just to have one character swoon over the beauty of the stolen descriptions (note the italicized phrase below).

SH pp 247-250:
It was a beautiful creamy-white trumpet-shaped flower that sent off a lemony scent and seemed to glow now in the twilight hour of evening. The flowers seemed even to be flaunting their scent, their curvy shape, their luminous color.[...] "I know this plant well," Swift Horse said, somewhat frowning. "Its name is Sacred Datura."

[...]"You talk of it as though it is a devil's plant."

"That is a good reference to describe it," Swift Horse said. "The Zuni used this flower as a hallucinogen by soaking and steeping the leaves into a tea, or chewing the leaves or roots to get the same effect."

[...]"The myth states that when the earth was still soft, two curious Zuni children spied on the gods and later gossiped about the secrets they saw," he began, the blanket no longer over his shoulders, either, but resting around his waist. "The twin war gods were so upset that they caused the earth to swallow up the children. At the place where they disappeared, the Sacred Datura grew and blossomed for the first time. I tell the children that the use of this plant, even by experienced shamans such as Bright Moon, is considered dangerous. Visions can result in convulsions-- or death."

[...]"This sinister flower has become part of my understanding of the natural world, where beauty and violence often intertwine," Swift Horse said hoarsely. "I must say, though, that the beautiful white trumpets of this Sacred Datura evoke in me a physical response-- a slight hollowness of the chest, a momentary stillness."

Martha started to tell him just how beautiful what he said was, but stopped and gasped when she saw something else that seemed surreal. Out of the twilight came a fast-flying, white-lined sphinx moth, stopping and hovering over a flower, feeding from it.

It hovered while feeding, its wings a white whir as it sipped nectar from the deep white tube, then whirled away like a spinning dervish. It became a blur in the air for a moment, and then poised itself before another flower, sipping nectar again, its heavy body keeping aloft by the beating of its narrow wings.

Swift Horse also watched the moth. "Each flower on a Sacred Datura blooms for only one night," he said. "During those brief hours, the large, silky, trumpet-shaped blossom must do everything it can to attract a suitor, one who will sip the sugary nectar at the base of the floral tube, pick up grains of pollen, and carry these off to fertilize another flower on another Sacred Datura plant. For this reason, alone, the petals open at twilight."


http://www.nrdc.org/onearth/04win/garden1.asp: "Sex in the Garden" by Sharman Apt Russell, On Earth Winter 2004:
Each flower on a sacred datura plant blooms only for a night. During those brief hours, the large silky trumpet-shaped blossom must do everything it can to attract a suitor: one who will sip the sugary nectar at the base of the floral tube, pick up grains of pollen (the flower's male sperm), and carry these off to fertilize another flower on another sacred datura. Sex is the sine qua non. For this reason alone, the creamy white petals of Datura wrightii open at twilight (or on cloudy days), release a lemony scent, and seem to glow in the dark.

[...]Varieties of the plant are also called thorn apple, angel's trumpet, moonflower, jimsonweed and, somewhat appropriately, devil's weed.

[...]Native Americans traditionally used sacred datura as a hallucinogen by soaking and steeping the leaves into a tea or chewing the seeds or roots. In one Zuni myth, "When the earth was still soft," two curious children spied on the gods and later gossiped about the secrets they saw. The Twin War Gods were so upset that they caused the earth to swallow up the children and, at the place where they disappeared, the sacred datura grew and blossomed for the first time. The use of the plant, even by experienced rain priests or shamans, is considered dangerous: Visions can turn into convulsions or death.

[...]This gorgeous, sinister flower has become part of my understanding of the natural world, where beauty and violence often intertwine -- or wear the same face. The beautiful white trumpets of the sacred datura still evoke in me a physical response: a slight hollowness in the chest, a momentary stillness. Perhaps that is why when Datura wrightii began to reappear on the edges of my garden, in the scruffier parts of the backyard where the ground slopes and weeds take over, I was happy to see the plant leaf and bloom. Often in the summer as the sky turned dusky, I would take a backyard stroll, drawn ineluctably to those opening flowers flaunting their scent, their curvy shape, their luminous color.

None of this come-hither had anything to do with me, of course. The drama of any flower is designed to attract its pollinator, usually an insect. For most sacred datura in the wild, that pollinator is a stout-bodied, fast-flying species of sphinx moth, often the tobacco hornworm moth (Manduca sexta). In my garden, however, the more popular visitor is the white-lined sphinx moth (Hyles lineata) commonly found across the United States.

Sometimes mistaken for a hummingbird, the white-lined sphinx moth hovers while feeding, its wings a-whir as it sips nectar from a larkspur or evening primrose or the deep white tube of a sacred datura. Its proboscis, or "drinking straw," extends more than an inch, over half the length of its body, a kind of magic trick, like pulling an impossibly long scarf from your sleeve. After a few seconds, the moth rotor-whirls away, a spinning dervish, a Black Hawk on a mission.

[...]My experience with white-lined sphinx moths is kaleidoscopic. They are a blur, a movement that seems half-imagined. Then, suddenly, they come perfectly in focus, poised before a white flower, the heavy body kept aloft by the beat of narrow wings.

-----

SH pp. 236-237:
She learned that Creek life was filled with ceremony and celebration. The return of hunters meant that a villagewide dance and feast of bear ribs barbecued with honey would be held.

But she now knew that the most important of all Creek ceremonial occasions was the Boskita, Busk, or Green Corn Ceremony, celebrated annually when the new maize had ripened and was ready for harvesting, as well as marking the beginning of a new year of plenty.

During the festival, a new fire was lit, the green corn was roasted, and a new year commenced.

The sacred fire of four logs represented the sun, the giver of life to the maize. The corn goddess, maize, fire, and the sun were all vital parts of Creek religion.


Tonight, as Marsha sat with Swift Horse, the moon high overhead, dancers performed around the huge outdoor fire, where earlier in the afternoon a part of the new harvest had been sacrificed, to the accompaniment of drums, rattles, and a flute made from the tibia of a deer's leg.

Marshe was astounded tonight by the dress of the women. They wore the usual dress, but what was new to Marsha was how they had dressed their legs in a kind of leather stockings, hung full of the hoofs of the roe deer in the form of bells. In addition, the women wore earrings, bracelets, and other ornaments, all of which made a variety of sounds that wafted into the night air.

SH p. 320:
After their vows had been exchanged and they had been blessed by Bright Moon, they had joined their people for a village-wide dance and a feast of bear's rubs barbecued with honey.

And we're back to Braund's Deerskins and Duffles again; all three of these preview snippets seem to be from page 24(?), but I'm not certain of their relative order within the original text:
Creek life was filled with ceremony and celebration. [...?]The return of hunters might mean a village-wide dance and feast of bear ribs barbecued with honey. [...?]The most important of all Creek ceremonial occasions was the Busk or the Green Corn Dance[...]

And Leitch Wright's Creeks and Seminoles, p. 22:
One merely has to consider the boskita (busk) or green corn festival celebrated annually when the new maize ripened. The busk marked the beginning of a new year. During this festival a new fire was lighted, the green corn roasted, and the new year commenced. [...]The sacred fire of four logs represented the sun, the giver of life to maize. The corn goddess, maize, fire, and the sun all remained a vital part of the Muscogulges' religion.

Braund, p. 24(?) again:
The dances were accompanied by chanting and singing as well as music from such instruments as the drum, rattles, and a flute made from the tibia of a deer's leg.

Braund, p. 125(?), citing another source:
They "dressed their legs in a kind of leather stockings, hung full of the hoofs of the roe deer in the form of bells." He counted 493 "claws" dangling from one dancer's stockings. In addition, the women wore earrings, bracelets, and other ornaments. When he considered that about sixty-two deer had been necessary to produce the "claws" adorning just one of the dancers, he determined that the costume was[...]

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SH, p. 262:
Marsha now knew about Sofkee, a gruel or soup, to which pieces of venison were added. She knew now that hardly a Creek household was without a Sofkee pot.

She knew that sunflower seeds and honey from bee trees were a favorite among the Creek community and that sweet potatoes were almost as important as corn, delicious when nuts were added to the sweet potato dishes.

Leitch Wright, p. 21(?):
The most common was sofkee, a gruel or soup, to which pieces of venison were sometimes added. Hardly a household was without a sofkee pot[...]

[...]also cultivated or gathered squash, beans, sunflower seeds, and honey from bee trees (in the eighteenth century often from their own hives[...]

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SH, pp 311-312:
Marsha had learned that the "chunkey yard" was an integral part of the Creek village. The yard where the game was played was continuously swept clean and was often surrounded by banks of earth from the repeated sweeping.

Braund, p. 17(?); relative order of passages not clear:
The chunkey yard was also an integral part of a[...?] The yard itself was continually swept clean and often was surrounded by banks of earth from the repeated sweeping. Chunkey was the most popular game of all[...?]

-----

SH, pp. 314-315:
"Our life--" Marsha started to say, but when she heard her son let out a loud whooping sound, she turned quickly, just in time to see his spear land the closest to the place where the chunkey stone had stopped, meaning he was the victor this time.

The first time she had seen this game played, was when Swift Horse had played it with his warriors. She had watched intensely as the players rolled a stone disk and then attempted to estimate where the stone disk would stop rolling. The object was to see who could land his spear closest to the place the chunkey stone had stopped, as Moon Thunder had just done.

["Moon Thunder"? I am *not* going to make a fart joke oops too late.]

Braund, p. 17(?):
Players rolled a stone disk and then attempted to estimate where the stone [...] land their stick or spear closest to the place the chunkey stone stopped. Other games that required more space were played on specially cleared lands near the town if the chunkey yard could not accommodate them[...]

If I correctly understand Braund's description of the game, then Edwards's verb tense in the phrase "the place where the chunkey stone had stopped" is incorrect, inasmuch as it suggests that the sequence of events is a.) the stone disk is bowled down the field, b.) the disk eventually stops rolling, c.) spears are thrown at the stationary target created by the disk's stopping point, and d.) the spear that lands closest to this stationary target is the winner. However, the preceding phrase "attempted to estimate where the stone disk would stop rolling" implies to me that the sequence is instead a.) the stone disk is bowled down the field, b.) spears are thrown into the field *ahead* of it, c.) the disk eventually stops rolling, and d.) the spear that had already landed at the closest point to the disk's eventual stopping point is the winner.

And that concludes my check of Swift Horse. There were a number of other suspicious-looking passages which I'd flagged but didn't find any matches for, which I suppose simply means that those sources aren't yet online. Not sure whether I have the stamina to start on another Edwards book just yet. Sheesh.

Wed, Jan. 16th, 2008 12:30 am (UTC)
nerdsholmferret

That first quote is supposed to be _spoken_ by a Native American?

"Post on LiveJournal", he said, motioning toward the keyboard. "Write about things that interest or amuse you, or even recount quotidian events, as is our custom."

Wed, Jan. 16th, 2008 01:10 am (UTC)
wombat1138

That first quote is supposed to be _spoken_ by a Native American?

Oh yes. And then there's the aforementioned escaped slave, who is mostly saddled with dialogue like "I'se be from the tip of Southern Florida land, but I don't knows figures or distances, but I do knows I'se traveled far, so far it hurts me to even think 'bout going further" and "I begs you to please let me stay. I'se good in the fields. I saw your crops, I'se can tend to dem" (pp 39-41); however, on p. 175, the same man gets to say, "Your people have endured much, too. I heard tales of it when I lived in Florida land. The Seminole did not get treated as bad as I heard tell Indians up north and out west were being treated. 'Genocide' I believe is the word I heard as a description of how it was when so many people of your skin color were killed."

The word "genocide" was coined ~1944. This story is supposed to take place in 1850.

But apparently Edwards can't even keep her facts straight about black-footed ferrets while plagiarizing about them.

Wed, Jan. 16th, 2008 03:40 am (UTC)
randomsome1

Sweet Christ. *gets her beatin' stick*

You linking SBTB to this for their updates as you go?

Wed, Jan. 16th, 2008 03:48 am (UTC)
wombat1138

I think I tossed a link for the previous post into one of their comment threads, but not this one yet.

@_@ *pretty colors oooooo*

Wed, Jan. 16th, 2008 03:51 am (UTC)
randomsome1

I can't believe that no one thought to run any of CE's books through plagiarism-detection software. Ever. That reeks of laziness and greed.